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The United States can and should be a worldwide leader in energy production and in developing solutions to climate change. Any long-term, sustainable solution requires support from both sides of the political aisle. That’s why I’m a member of the Senate Climate Solutions Caucus, a bipartisan group seeking to advance smart climate policy. It’s imperative that we do our part to protect our planet for future generations.

The path to dramatic improvement in global climate conditions is through private sector innovation. I support funding for innovation in carbon capture, clean infrastructure, renewables development—including small modular nuclear, hydropower, geothermal, solar, and wind—and climate and energy research to reduce costs, accelerate commercialization and export to high-carbon-emitting nations.

It’s not enough to limit new global emissions; we must also manage ambient air through direct air capture technologies to remove carbon already in the atmosphere. The U.S. should play a leadership role in the development and adaptation of innovative technologies. 

Even with historic investments in clean technology innovations, we must recognize that fossil fuels will continue to play a role in our energy mix. Nearly two-thirds of the United States’ oil, gas, and other minerals come from Utah. Our natural gas and crude oil production, particularly in the Uinta Basin, not only supports good-paying jobs in our state, but also our nation’s energy independence. I support efforts to continue to look for solutions to methane leakage while recognizing the vital role the industry plays for our rural communities. 

As the American West continues to get drier, it’s critical that we continue looking for ways to shore up our resources. Utah currently faces unprecedented environmental challenges, including a historic drought and a record number of wildfires. The Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, the bipartisan infrastructure bill I helped negotiate in 2021, secured funding for the Central Utah Project Completion Act, the Wildland Fire Management & Mitigation Act, the Western Area Power Administration, wildfire mitigation and recovery, drought contingency planning, and Utah’s water revolving funds. The bill also fully funded the Navajo Utah Water Rights Settlement Act, bringing running water to the 40% of Navajo Nation in Utah who lack it.