Working Families

There are only a handful of states where births are outpacing deaths, and one of them is Utah. That means a lot of Utah families are having children, and it also means added expenses for those families. Too often, support for families turns into a maze of complicated, bureaucratic programs that put power in the hands of the federal government, not parents. To help even the playing field, I introduced the Family Security Act—legislation to modernize federal support into a monthly cash benefit that lets parents choose how best to support their family. The Family Security Act would also support families during pregnancy, promote marriage, and provide equal treatment for both working and stay-at-home parents.

Paid parental leave is another important issue for families. In Utah, and throughout the United States, a majority of working parents do not get paid when they take time off from work after the birth or adoption of a child, which can mean depleted savings, credit card debt, and student loan defaults. Along with Senator Rubio (R-FL), I introduced the New Parents Act, legislation that would create a voluntary option for paid parental leave by allowing parents to use a portion of their Social Security after the birth or adoption of a child. My plan would not raise taxes or create a new entitlement program, but rather it would give parents access to funds they have already earned.

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